History of Kerosene Lamps

Petroleum Products. In the early 19th century, lamp designs burned many different fuels, including rapeseed oil, lard, and whale oil rendered from whale blubber and the more expensive spermaceti from the head of sperm whales , but most Americans could only afford light emitted by animal-fat, tallow candles. By , the U. Patent Office recorded almost different patents for all manner of lamps, wicks, burners, and fuels to meet growing consumer demand for illumination. At the time, most Americans still lived in almost complete darkness when the sun went down. It was inexpensive but volatile; camphene lamps could explode. In , Henry Porter of Bangor, Maine, patented his camphene mixture and opened a business to sell it in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. The concoction combined one part turpentine with four parts alcohol, and a small amount of camphor for aroma. It burned bright and smelled good, but was dangerous, according to the Boston Mattapan Register, which reported that house fires and injuries were common. The newspaper noted on September 10,

Kerosene lamp

Discussion in ‘ Antique Discussion ‘ started by tyeldom3 , Nov 12, Log in or Sign up. Antiques Board. Old oil lamp, age? Help, no lamp knowledge here What is this glass called?

Let’s imagine it’s the end of the 19th century, it’s night and you have to do something outside. Oil lamp doesn’t give enough light and you can’t detach gas lamp.

Light is important. It’s always been a focal point in homes for families throughout history. Light has gone from a simple fire to torches, and then to kerosene oil lamps. So many antique lamps were designed for aesthetics and durability, which is why people collect them to this day. But there are a lot of different types of antique lamps as well as modern replicas that are antique-styled. When looking for an authentic antique lamp, there are several things you should keep in mind.

Most early antique oil lamps were more functional than decorative and sometimes wasted oil. But in the early s, the Betty style oil lamp was created, which was an improvement on older models featuring uncovered dishes that wasted oil and produced too much spoke. It’s made of metals, such as tin, copper or bronze, and has a pick on a chain to grasp a dropped oil wick.

The Betty style oil lamp was also designed to be hung up to light a room, and was very popular among colonialists.

Old oil lamp, age?, glass type?, etc…

Although in use for thousands of years and generally useful, oil lamp had its faults. It was not that efficient, it had low light and oil could not be stored for a long time – it would spoil. Gas light had a better light but it was not portable.

There is nothing quite like genuine antique lamps, an oil lamp or a beautiful antique For an antique lamp to hold its value, it must date back at least years.

A lamp is a device that holds and burns fuel, typically oil, as a means of producing light. Although oil lamps have taken on a variety of shapes and sizes throughout history, the basic required components are a wick, fuel, a reservoir for fuel, and an air supply to maintain a flame. Diagram of oil lamp features Westenholz, Some of the earliest lamps, dating to the Upper Paleolithic, were stones with depressions in which animal fats were likely burned as a source of light. Shells, such as conch or oyster, were also employed as lamps, and even may have served as the prototype for early lamp forms.

Initially, they took the form of a saucer with a floating wick. Soon after, these saucers began to develop a pinched or folded rim which resulted in a nozzle and served the purpose of holding the wick in place, thus controlling the flame as well as the smoke. As they evolved, clay lamps became more enclosed, moving from a pinched nozzle to a bridged nozzle, and sporting the addition of a rim.

These changes aided in reducing the amount of oil lost through spillage.

1:48 scale Victorian kerosene table lamps

I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and. The nature of my invention consists in the construction and arrangement of a series of kerosene-Oil lainpsconnected by gas-pipe, and all supplied with oil from one reservoir, and’ which are especially adapted for lighting stores, churches, public halls, Src.

In order to enable others skilled in the art to which my invention appertains tol make and use the same, I will now proceed to describe its construction and operation, referring to the annexed drawings, in which- Figure lis a plan view of a set of my lamps -with reservoir, such as they are generally arranged for lighting a store-room. A represents gas-pipe by which the fonts B and C, also tank or reservoir D, are attached, it being all connected so that the oil will dow from the tank D through the pipe A and the fonts BV and supply all the fonts with oil.

The fonts B and O have a recess, a, below the pipe, which serves as a receptacle for the lower end of the wick b, so that it will not obstruct the free.

Save money on your antique styled oil lamps contents page glass lamps with. Early ‘s patent date. Perhaps this interview, dating to burn kerosene.

Oil lamps have been a primary source of lighting for centuries. Although they were generally inefficient and difficult to store, these lamps gave light to a formerly dark world. Medical doctor and geologist Abraham Gesner began distilling coal to produce a clear fluid by He discovered that this clear fluid produced a bright yellow flame when used to power a traditional oil lamp.

This discovery made kerosene much more affordable. At the same time, American businessman Robert Dietz and his brother patented the first functional flat wick burner that was specially designed for kerosene.

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Aladdin lamps were unique in the use of a round wick to provide an even non flickering flame, and a rare earth mantle that glowed to produce the light of a 60 watt light bulb when heated by the flame from the kerosene lamp. The difference between the light of the Aladdin lamps and any other oil or kerosene lamp was so great that the company offered a one thousand dollar reward to any person who could show them an oil lamp that could equal its light.

The reward was never collected, and by the early ‘s seven million Aladdins had been sold!

Buy Book 4: Kerosene Lamps (The Non-Electric Lighting Series): Read Kindle ); Publication Date: March 22, ; Sold by: Services LLC.

Read more. Arens were well known gold smiths who were working very stylish. Still with A Victorian Cranberry glass finger lamp, brass burner complete with wick. Approximately 12 inches tall. In excellent condition. The kerosene tank and base are made of black, hand cut glass. The glass shade has a decorative, etched motif. Structural elements made of brass. Height: 63 cm, diameter 16 cm. In good condition. The oil reservoir is of unusual shape, it is cranberry with white

Kerosene Lamp Images

As burners became worn or broken, they were often replaced with any burner available at the time. Many early lamps are not found with an appropriate period burner. This is particularly true of fluid burning and whale oil lamps. Many fluid and whale oil lamps were “converted” to burn kerosene, and the original burners set aside.

Early, and correct period, burners add significant value to a lamp. A decision to purchase a particular lamp should include some consideration to the overall completeness and correctness of the component parts.

To date we have directly reached over 5, children. The name “Kerosene Lamp” refers to the lighting used by Adonal to study on an island without electricity.

A kerosene lamp also known as a paraffin lamp in some countries is a type of lighting device that uses kerosene as a fuel. Kerosene lamps have a wick or mantle as light source, protected by a glass chimney or globe; lamps may be used on a table, or hand-held lanterns may be used for portable lighting. Like oil lamps , they are useful for lighting without electricity, such as in regions without rural electrification , in electrified areas during power outages , at campsites , and on boats.

There are three types of kerosene lamp: flat-wick, central-draught tubular round wick , and mantle lamp. Kerosene lanterns meant for portable use have a flat wick and are made in dead-flame, hot-blast, and cold-blast variants. Pressurized kerosene lamps use a gas mantle ; these are known as Petromax , Tilley lamps , or Coleman lamps, among other manufacturers. They produce more light per unit of fuel than wick-type lamps, but are more complex and expensive in construction and more complex to operate.

Preppers Oil Lamp Test & Review $6 Walmart lamp with Colman Kerosene